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The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 2012;43(2):81–89
Published Online:https://doi.org/10.3928/00220124-20111011-02Cited by:19

Abstract

Background:

Historically, the instructional method of choice has been traditional lecture or face-to-face education; however, changes in the health care environment, including resource constraints, have necessitated examination of this practice.

Methods:

A descriptive pre-/posttest method was used to determine the effectiveness of alternative teaching modalities on nurses’ knowledge and confidence in electrocardiogram (EKG) interpretation. A convenience sample of 135 nurses was recruited in an integrated health care system in the Southeastern United States. Nurses attended an instructor-led course, an online learning (e-learning) platform with no study time or 1 week of study time, or an e-learning platform coupled with a 2-hour post-course instructor-facilitated debriefing with no study time or 1 week of study time. Instruments included a confidence scale, an online EKG test, and a course evaluation.

Results:

Statistically significant differences in knowledge and confidence were found for individual groups after nurses participated in the intervention. Statistically significant differences were found in pre-knowledge and post-confidence when groups were compared.

Conclusion:

Organizations that use various instructional methods to educate nurses in EKG interpretation can use different teaching modalities without negatively affecting nurses’ knowledge or confidence in this skill.

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