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Psychiatric Annals, 2020;50(7):289–294
Published Online:https://doi.org/10.3928/00485713-20200613-01Cited by:5

Abstract

Health care workers are on the front lines of the recent pandemic, facing significant challenges to their physical and mental health. This article details the efforts undertaken by a health care system and two academically affiliated hospital systems to provide emotional support to their frontline staff. The multipronged approach describes coordinating efforts to decrease duplication of services and to increase centralization of information. This included enhancing pathways for faculty, staff, and trainees to obtain individual and group treatment and to have access to high-quality self-help resources. Continuous feedback has been elicited to ensure that efforts are consistent with expressed needs and in turn services undergo modifications as needed. This article seeks to provide an overview of how one health system has thus far approached the important issue of staff support as well as the challenges experienced and lessons learned along the way. [Psychiatr Ann. 2020;50(7):288–294.]

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