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Effect of Individualized Music on Agitation in Individuals with Dementia Who Live at Home

    Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 2009;35(8):47–55
    Published Online:https://doi.org/10.3928/00989134-20090706-01Cited by:40

    Abstract

    This pilot study investigated the effect of individualized music on agitation in individuals with dementia who live at home. Fifteen individuals listened to their preferred music for 30 minutes prior to peak agitation time, two times per week for 2 weeks, followed by no music intervention for 2 weeks. The process was repeated once. The findings showed that mean agitation levels were significantly lower while listening to music than before listening to the music. The findings of this pilot study suggest the importance of music intervention for individuals with dementia who live at home.

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