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Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 2020;46(1):37–46
Published Online:https://doi.org/10.3928/00989134-20191217-01Cited by:2

Abstract

The current qualitative research explored perceived effects of three nonpharmacological interventions (chair yoga [CY], participatory music intervention [MI], and chair-based exercise [CBE]) in managing symptoms in older adults with Alzheimer's disease or dementia with Lewy bodies from family caregivers' perspectives. Three focus groups were conducted following completion of the 12-week interventions. Constant comparative analysis determined whether each intervention had perceived effects on symptoms, based on caregivers' perspectives. Three major themes emerged: (a) Changes in Cognitive Symptoms, (b) Changes in Physical Function, and (c) Changes in Mood, Behavioral Symptoms, and Sleep Disturbance. Results can be integrated into treatment plans for older adults with dementia. Future research should focus on CY or CBE with support from caregivers to manage dementia symptoms and compare CY or CBE practiced with caregivers against CBE or CY practiced solely by participants with dementia. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 46(1), 37–46.]

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