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Journal of Nursing Education, 2005;44(9):396–403
Published Online:https://doi.org/10.3928/01484834-20050901-03Cited by:8

Abstract

In this article, we describe the developmental process of a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program that uses interdisciplinary resources to create unique DNP curriculum opportunities. Other schools may benefit from this experience in the development of their own DNP programs. The program delivers an innovative curriculum from post-baccalaureate to doctorate, emphasizing health care engineering and interdisciplinary collaboration among faculty, hospitals, community leaders, and policymakers. This DNP program is uniquely situated to provide leadership in solving complex clinical problems through its partnership with the Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering, the School of Pharmacy, the Homeland Security Institute, and the Center on Aging and the Life Course.

Doctoral coursework, interdisciplinary collaboration, health care engineering/systems approaches, and new knowledge result in uniquely qualified providers. Post-baccalaureate students complete the university's Adult Nurse Practitioner program or its developing Pediatric Nurse Practitioner program during the first 2 years of the 4-year curriculum. A total of 83 post-baccalaureate credit hours include 1,526 hours of supervised clinical practice, a health policy residency, and cognate residencies in an area of specialization. The seven core competencies recommended by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing are incorporated into the curriculum.

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