Skip to main content
Journal of Nursing Education, 2012;51(6):345–348
Published Online:https://doi.org/10.3928/01484834-20120427-03Cited by:13

Abstract

Despite the turmoil of a worldwide economic crisis, the health sector remains largely understaffed, and the nursing shortage represents a major issue that jeopardizes graduate nursing education. Access to education remains a challenge, particularly in rural and remote areas. This article reports the process of developing an asynchronous online qualitative research course. This online course was piloted among 16 interdisciplinary students. Participants agreed that experiential learning was useful to understand the intricacies of qualitative research. Within this constructivist approach, students were immersed in real-life experiences, which focused on the development of skills applicable to qualitative research. Based on the findings, we suggest that constructivism and the Four-Component Instructional Design (4C/ID) model (a four-part approach for fostering the development of complex skills) represent valuable ontological and pedagogical approaches that can be used in online courses. Triangulating these two approaches is also congruent with the student-centered philosophy that underpins nursing graduate programs.

  • Allen M.K., Ceolin R., Ouelette S., Plante J., Vaillancourt C. (2007). Educating health workers: A statistical portrait. Ottawa, ON: Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics.

    > Google Scholar
  • American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2011). Nursing shortage fact sheet. Retrieved from http://www.aacn.nche.edu/media-relations/fact-sheets/nursing-shortage

    > Google Scholar
  • Andrews M.E., Stewart N.J., Pitblado J.R., Morgan D.G., Forbes D., D’Arcy C. (2005). Registered nurses working alone in rural and remote Canada. Canadian Journal of Nursing Research, 37, 14–33.

    > MedlineGoogle Scholar
  • Buerhaus P.I., Auerbach D.I., Staiger D.O. (2009). The recent surge in nurse employment: Causes and implications. Health Affairs, 28, w657–w668.10.1377/hlthaff.28.4.w657

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Canadian Nurses Association. (2011). Tested solutions for eliminating Canada’s registered nurses shortage. Retrieved from http://www2.cna-aiic.ca/CNA/documents/pdf/publications/RN_Highlights_e.pdf

    > Google Scholar
  • Care D.W., Russell C.K., Hartig M.T., Murrell V.S., Gregory D.M. (2007). Challenges, issues, and barriers to student-centered approaches in distance education. In , Young L.E., Paterson B.L. (Eds.), Teaching nursing: Developing a student-centered learning environment (pp. 484–502). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

    > Google Scholar
  • Cleary B.L., Barron McBride A., McClure M.L., Reinhard S.C. (2009). Expanding the capacity of nursing education. Health Affairs, 28, w634–w645.10.1377/hlthaff.28.4.w634

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Engebretson J., Littleton L.Y. (2001). Cultural negotiation: A constructivist-based model for nursing practice. Nursing Outlook, 49, 223–230.10.1067/mno.2001.115749

    > Crossref MedlineGoogle Scholar
  • Goldman G. (2005). Commentary on ‘Distance education: A strategy for leadership development.’Nursing Education Perspectives, 26, 364–365.

    > Google Scholar
  • Guba E., Lincoln Y.S. (1994). Competing paradigms in qualitative research. In , Denzin N., Lincoln Y. (Eds.), Handbook of qualitative research (pp. 105–117). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

    > Google Scholar
  • Herrington J., Oliver R., Reeves T.C. (2003). Patterns of engagement in authentic online learning environments. Australian Journal of Educational Technology, 19, 59–71.

    > Google Scholar
  • Huang H.M. (2002). Toward constructivism for adult learners in online learning environment. British Journal of Educational Technology, 33, 27–37.10.1111/1467-8535.00236

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Hunter J.L. (2008). Applying constructivism to nursing education in cultural competence: A course that bears repeating. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 19, 354–362.10.1177/1043659608322421

    > Crossref MedlineGoogle Scholar
  • Institute of Medicine. (2010). The future of nursing: Leading change, advancing health. Retrieved from http://thefutureofnursing.org

    > Google Scholar
  • Jillings C. (2007). Barriers to student-centered teaching: Overcoming institutional and attitudinal obstacles. In , Young L.E., Paterson B.L. (Eds.), Teaching nursing: Developing a student-centered learning environment (pp. 467–483). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

    > Google Scholar
  • Lattuca L.R. (2006). The constructivist pedagogy we’re looking for. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 60, 354–358.10.1177/107769580506000404

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Ledwell E.A., Andrusyszyn M.A., Iwasiw C.L. (2006). Nursing students’ empowerment in distance education: Testing Kanter’s theory. Journal of Distance Education, 21, 78–95.

    > Google Scholar
  • Legg T.J., Adelman D., Mueller D., Levitt C. (2009). Constructivist strategies in online distance education in nursing. Journal of Nursing Education, 48, 64–69.10.3928/01484834-20090201-08

    > LinkGoogle Scholar
  • Marquis B.L., Huston C.J. (2011). Employee recruitment, selection, placement and indoctrination. In , Marquis B.L., Huston C.J. (Eds.), Leadership roles and management functions in nursing: Theory and application (7th ed., pp. 374–353). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

    > Google Scholar
  • Penz K., D’arcy C., Stewart N., Kosteniuk J., Morgan D., Smith B. (2007). Barriers to participation in continuing education activities among rural and remote nurses. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 38, 58–66.

    > LinkGoogle Scholar
  • Reeves T.C., Herrington J., Oliver R. (2002). Authentic activities and online learning. In , Goody A., Herrington J., Northcote M. (Eds.), Quality conversations: Research and Development in Higher Education, Vol. 25 (pp. 562–567). Jamison, ACT: The Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia.

    > Google Scholar
  • Skorga P. (2002). Interdisciplinary and distance education in the Delta: The Delta Health Education Partnership. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 16, 150–157.10.1080/13561820220124166

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Udod S.A., Care W.D. (2002). Lessons learned in developing and delivering web-based graduate courses: A faculty perspective. Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 33, 19–23.

    > LinkGoogle Scholar
  • U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2009). Occupational employment statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/oes/

    > Google Scholar
  • van Merriënboer J.J.G., Bastiaens T., Hoogveld A. (2004). Instructional design for e-learning. In , Jochems W., van Merriënboer J., Koper R. (Eds.), Integrated e-learning: Implications for pedagogy, technology and organization (pp. 13–22). London, UK: Routledge Falmer.

    > Google Scholar
  • van Merriënboer J.J.G., Clark R.E., de Croock M.B.M. (2002). Blueprints for complex learning: The 4C/ID model. Educational Technology, Research and Development, 50, 39–64.10.1007/BF02504993

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • van Merriënboer J.J.G., Kester L. (2005). The four-component instructional design model: Multimedia principles in environments for complex learning. In , Mayer R.E. (Ed.), The Cambridge handbook of multimedia learning (pp. 71–93). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

    > Google Scholar
  • van Merriënboer J.J.G., Kirschner P.A., Kester L. (2003). Taking the load off a learner’s mind: Instructional design for complex learning. Educational Psychologist, 38, 5–13.10.1207/S15326985EP3801_2

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Windschitl M. (2002). Framing constructivism in practice as the negotiation of dilemmas: An analysis of the conceptual, pedagogical, cultural, and political challenges facing teachers. Review of Educational Research, 72, 131–175.10.3102/00346543072002131

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Young L.E., Maxwell B. (2007). Student-centered teaching in nursing: From rote to active learning. In , Young L.E., Paterson B.L. (Eds.), Teaching nursing: Developing a student centered learning environment (pp. 3–25). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

    > Google Scholar

We use cookies on this site to enhance your user experience. For a complete overview of all the cookies used, please see our privacy policy.

×