Skip to main content
Journal of Nursing Education, 2016;55(9):522–527
Published Online:https://doi.org/10.3928/01484834-20160816-06Cited by:17

Abstract

Background:

Nurse educators are increasingly using high-fidelity simulators to improve prelicensure nursing students' ability to develop clinical judgment. Traditionally, oral debriefing sessions have immediately followed the simulation scenarios as a method for students to connect theory to practice and therefore develop clinical judgment. Recently, video recording of the simulation scenarios is being incorporated.

Method:

This qualitative, interpretive description study was conducted to identify whether self-reflection on video-recorded high-fidelity simulation (HFS) scenarios helped prelicensure nursing students to develop clinical judgment. Tanner's clinical judgment model was the framework for this study.

Results:

Four themes emerged from this study: Confidence, Communication, Decision Making, and Change in Clinical Practice.

Conclusion:

This study indicated that self-reflection of video-recorded HFS scenarios is beneficial for prelicensure nursing students to develop clinical judgment. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(9):522–527.]

  • Anderson J.K., Nelson K. (2015). Patterns of communication in high-fidelity simulation. Journal of Nursing Education, 54, 22–27.10.3928/01484834-20141228-01

    > LinkGoogle Scholar
  • Bailey C., Johnson-Russell J., Lupient A. (2011). High-fidelity patient simulation. In , Bradshaw M., Lowenstein A. (Eds.), Innovative teaching strategies in nursing and related health professions (5th ed., pp. 207–226). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

    > Google Scholar
  • Blum C., Borglund S., Parcells D. (2010). High-fidelity nursing simulation: Impact on student self-confidence and clinical competence. International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 7, 1–14.10.2202/1548-923X.2035

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Bussard M. (2013). Interpretive description of clinical judgment within reflective journals of nursing students participating in high-fidelity simulation (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest. (3578583).

    > Google Scholar
  • Bussard M. (2015a). Clinical judgment in reflective journals of prelicensure nursing students. Journal of Nursing Education, 54, 36–40.10.3928/01484834-20141224-05

    > LinkGoogle Scholar
  • Bussard M. (2015b). High-fidelity simulation to teach accountability to prelicensure nursing students. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 11, 425–430 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecns.2015.05.00910.1016/j.ecns.2015.05.009

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Cato M.L. (2012). Using simulation in nursing education. In , Jeffries P.R. (Ed.), Simulation in nursing education: From conceptualization to evaluation (2nd ed., pp. 1–12). New York, NY: National League for Nursing.

    > Google Scholar
  • Chronister C., Brown D. (2012). Comparison of simulation debriefing methods. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 8, e281–e288.10.1016/j.ecns.2010.12.005

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Coffman S. (2012). From static lab to simulation lab: Students reflect on their learning. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 8, e335–e340.10.1016/j.ecns.2011.01.003

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Dewey J. (1991). How we think. Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books. (Original work published 1910)

    > Google Scholar
  • Dreifuerst K.T. (2009). The essentials of debriefing in simulation learning: A concept analysis. Nursing Education Perspectives, 30, 109–114.10.1043/1536-5026-030.002.0109

    > Crossref MedlineGoogle Scholar
  • Dunn K.E., Osborne C., Link H.J. (2014). High-fidelity simulation and nursing student self-efficacy: Does training help the little engines know they can?Nursing Education Perspectives, 35, 403–404.10.5480/12-1041.1

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Grant J.S., Moss J., Epp C., Watts P. (2010). Using video-facilitated feedback to improve student performance following high-fidelity simulation. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, e177–e183.10.1016/j.ecns.2009.09.001

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Groom J.A., Henderson D., Sittner B.J. (2014). NLN/Jeffries simulation framework state of the science project: Simulation design characteristics. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 10, 337–344 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecns.2013.02.00410.1016/j.ecns.2013.02.004

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Harder B.N. (2010). Use of simulation in teaching and learning in health sciences: A systematic review. Journal of Nursing Education, 49, 23–28.10.3928/01484834-20090828-08

    > LinkGoogle Scholar
  • Hinchcliffe-Duphily N. (2014). Simulation education: A primer for professionalism. Teaching and Learning in Nursing, 9, 126–129 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.teln.2014.03.00310.1016/j.teln.2014.03.003

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Howard V.M., Englert N., Kameg K., Perozzi K. (2011). Integration of simulation across the undergraduate curriculum: Student and faculty perspectives. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 7, e1–e10.10.1016/j.ecns.2009.10.004

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Jeffries P.R. (2005). A framework for designing, implementing, and evaluating simulations used as teaching strategies in nursing. Nursing Education Perspectives, 26, 96–103.

    > MedlineGoogle Scholar
  • Lasater K. (2007). High-fidelity simulation and the development of clinical judgment: Students' experiences. Journal of Nursing Education, 46, 269–276.

    > LinkGoogle Scholar
  • Mariani B., Cantrell M.A., Meakim C., Prieto P., Dreifuerst K.T. (2013). Structured debriefing and students' clinical judgment abilities in simulation. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 9, e147–e155.10.1016/j.ecns.2011.11.009

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Meakim C., Boese T., Decker S., Franklin A.E., Gloe D., Lioce L., Borum J.C. (2013). Standards of best practice: Simulation standard I: Terminology. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 9, S3–S11 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecns.2013.04.00110.1016/j.ecns.2013.04.001

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Megel M.E., Bailey C., Schnell A., Whiteaker D., Vogel A. (2013). High-fidelity simulation: How are we using the videos?Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 9, e305–e310.10.1016/j.ecns.2012.04.003

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Oldenburg N.L., Brandt K., Maney C., Selig K. (2012). Student-created scenarios in the high-fidelity simulation laboratory. Journal of Nursing Education, 51, 702–706.10.3928/01484834-20121030-02

    > LinkGoogle Scholar
  • Phillips D.I. (2011). Supporting the lecturer to deliver high-fidelity simulation. Nursing Standard, 25, 35–40.10.7748/ns2011.08.25.49.35.c8651

    > Crossref MedlineGoogle Scholar
  • Ravert P., McAfooes J. (2014). NLN/Jeffries simulation framework: State of the science summary. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 10, 335–336 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecns.2013.06.00210.1016/j.ecns.2013.06.002

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Reed S.J., Andrews C.M., Ravert P. (2013). Debriefing simulations: Comparison of debriefing with video and debriefing alone. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 9, e585–e591 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecns.2013.05.00710.1016/j.ecns.2013.05.007

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Reese C., Jeffries P., Engum S. (2010). Learning together: Using simulation to develop nursing and medical student collaboration. Nursing Education Perspectives, 31, 33–37.

    > MedlineGoogle Scholar
  • Rizzolo M.A. (2012). Summary and future considerations. In , Jeffries P.R. (Ed.), Simulation in nursing education: From conceptualization to evaluation (2nd ed., pp. 231–238). New York, NY: National League for Nursing.

    > Google Scholar
  • Schön D.A. (1987). Educating the reflective practitioner. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

    > Google Scholar
  • Sharpnack P.A., Goliat L., Baker J.R., Rogers K., Shockey P. (2013). Thinking like a nurse: Using video simulation to rehearse for professional practice. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 9, e571–e577 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecns.2013.05.00410.1016/j.ecns.2013.05.004

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Shinnick M.A., Woo M., Horwich T.B., Steadman R. (2011). Debriefing: The most important component in simulation?Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 7, e105–e111.10.1016/j.ecns.2010.11.005

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Tanner C. (2006). Thinking like a nurse: A research-based model of clinical judgment in nursing. Journal of Nursing Education, 45, 204–211.

    > LinkGoogle Scholar
  • Thomas-Dreifuerst K.T., Decker S.I. (2012). Debriefing: An essential component for learning in simulation pedagogy. In , Jeffries P.R. (Ed.), Simulation in nursing education: From conceptualization to evaluation (2nd ed., pp. 105–130). New York, NY: National League for Nursing.

    > Google Scholar
  • Thorne S. (2008). Interpretive description. Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press.

    > Google Scholar
  • Watts W.E., Rush K., Wright M. (2009). Evaluating first-year nursing students' ability to self-assess psychomotor skills using videotape. Nursing Education Perspectives, 30, 214–219.

    > MedlineGoogle Scholar
  • Winters J., Hauck B., Riggs C.J., Clawson J., Collins J. (2003). Use of videotaping to assess competencies and course outcomes. Journal of Nursing Education, 42, 472–476.

    > LinkGoogle Scholar
  • Yoo M.S., Yoo Y., Lee H. (2010). Nursing students' self-evaluation using a video recording of foley catheterization: Effects on students' competence, communication skills, and learning motivation. Journal of Nursing Education, 49, 402–405.10.3928/01484834-20100331-03

    > LinkGoogle Scholar
  • Yuan H.B., Williams B.A., Man C.Y. (2014). Nursing students' clinical judgment in high-fidelity simulation based learning: A quasi-experimental study. Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, 4, 7–15 http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/jnep.v4n5p710.5430/jnep.v4n5p7

    > CrossrefGoogle Scholar

We use cookies on this site to enhance your user experience. For a complete overview of all the cookies used, please see our privacy policy.

×