Skip to main content
Published Online:https://doi.org/10.3928/01484834-20180221-06Cited by:8

Abstract

Background:

Nursing programs continue to be challenged to increase recruitment and retention of ethnic minority nursing students to meet the needs of a diversifying population. Ethnic minority students face a cadre of barriers, one of which is the negative implications of their own identity. This article describes a qualitative study that explored the experiences of stereotype threat among a group of ethnic minority nursing students at a large urban university.

Method:

Semistructured, one-time in-depth interviews were conducted.

Result:

Three themes emerged: A Sense of Uncertainty About Abilities, Avoidance, and Vigilance for Signs of Failure.

Conclusion:

Nursing faculty and administrators may better support ethnic minority nursing students through graduation by having an awareness of the implications of stereotype threat. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(3):159–162.]

  • Ackerman-Barger K., Valerama-Wallace C., Latimore D., Drake C. (2016). Stereotype threat susceptibility among minority health professions students. Journal of Best Practices in Health Professions Diversity, 9, 1232–1246.

    Google Scholar
  • American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2016). The changing landscape: Nursing student diversity on the rise. Washington, DC: Author.

    Google Scholar
  • Aronson J., Burgess D., Phelan S., Juarez S. (2013). Unhealthy interactions: The role of stereotype threat in health disparities. American Journal of Public Health, 103, 50–56.10.2105/AJPH.2012.300828

    Crossref MedlineGoogle Scholar
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2015). Occupational outlook handbook: Registered nurses. Retrieved from https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/registered-nurses.htm

    Google Scholar
  • Day-Calder M. (2017). Imposter syndrome. Nursing Standard, 31, 35.

    Google Scholar
  • Diefenbeck C., Michalec B., Alexander R. (2016). Lived experiences of racially and ethnically underrepresented minority BSN students: A case study specifically exploring issues related to recruitment and retention. Nursing Education Perspectives, 37, 41–44.

    Crossref MedlineGoogle Scholar
  • Garnder J. (2005). Barriers influencing the success of racial and ethnic minority students in nursing programs. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 16, 155–162.10.1177/1043659604273546

    Crossref MedlineGoogle Scholar
  • Johns M., Schmader T., Inzlicht M. (2008). Stereotype threat and executive resource depletion: examining the influence of emotion regulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 137, 691–705.10.1037/a0013834

    Crossref MedlineGoogle Scholar
  • Jones A. (2001). A condensed history of the phenomenology: The first and second phases from Franz Brentano to Hans-Georg Gadamer. Nurse Researcher, 8, 65–75.10.7748/nr2001.07.8.4.65.c6167

    CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Love K. (2010). The lived experience of socialization among African American nursing students in a predominantly white university. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 21, 342–350.10.1177/1043659609360711

    Crossref MedlineGoogle Scholar
  • Matthews J., Lauremann F., Banerjee M. (2014). Academic identity formation and motivation among ethnic minority adolescents: The role of the “self” between internal and external perceptions of identity. Child Development, 85, 2355–2373.

    MedlineGoogle Scholar
  • Mehta S., Newbold J., O'Rourke M. (2011). Why do first-generation students fail?College Student Journal, 45, 20–36.

    Google Scholar
  • Morrow J., Ackermann M. (2012). Intention to persist and retention of first-year students: the importance of motivation and sense of belonging. College Student Journal, 46, 483–491.

    Google Scholar
  • Murray T. (2015). Factors that promote and impede the academic success of African American students in prelicensure nursing education: An integrative review. The Journal of Nursing Education. 54. (9, Suppl.) S74–S81.10.3928/01484834-20150814-14

    LinkGoogle Scholar
  • National League for Nursing. (2014). Percentage of minority students enrolled in basic RN programs: 1995, 2003 to 2005, 2009 to 2012, and 2014. NLN Biennial survey of schools. Retrieved from http://www.nln.org/newsroom/nursing-education-statistics/nursing-student-demographics

    Google Scholar
  • Phillips J., Malone B. (2016). Increasing racial/ethnic diversity in nursing to reduce health disparities and achieve health equity. Public Health Representative, 129 (2, Suppl.), 45–50.

    Google Scholar
  • Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. (2016). Charting nursing's future. Reports that can inform policy and practice, 27, 1–8.

    Google Scholar
  • Schmader T. (2010). Stereotype threat deconstructed. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 19, 14–18.10.1177/0963721409359292

    CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • Schmader T., Forbes C., Johns M. (2008). An integrated process model of stereotype threat effects of performance. Psychological Review, 115, 336–356.10.1037/0033-295X.115.2.336

    Crossref MedlineGoogle Scholar
  • Steele C. (2010). Whistling Vivaldi. How stereotypes affect us and what we can do. New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc.

    Google Scholar
  • Steele C., Aronsen J. (1995). Stereotype threat and the intellectual test performance of African Americans. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 69, 797–811.10.1037/0022-3514.69.5.797

    Crossref MedlineGoogle Scholar
  • Tatum B. (2000). The ABC approach to creating climates of engagement on diverse campuses. Liberal Education, 86, 22–29.

    Google Scholar
  • U.S. Census Bureau. (2014). 2014 Quickfacts [Data file]. Retrieved from https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/

    Google Scholar

We use cookies on this site to enhance your user experience. For a complete overview of all the cookies used, please see our privacy policy.

×