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Published Online:https://doi.org/10.3928/01913913-20050301-03Cited by:6

Abstract

Purpose:

To compare measurements of eccentric fixation using two different targets for fixation, a traditional visuoscope target and the streak target of an ophthalmoscope.

Patients and Methods:

Monocular fixation was evaluated using visuoscopy in 47 patients ranging in age from 4 months to 22 years. Visuoscopy measurements were compared using both the traditional visuoscope target and the streak target of a Welch Allyn ophthalmoscope. The streak light was rotated both horizontally and vertically to detect both horizontal and vertical eccentric fixation.

Results:

The streak target improved testability of eccentric fixation in children younger than 3 years compared to the traditional visuoscope target (75% versus 30%). All of the patients older than 3 years were testable using both targets, with both methods yielding the same results. All of the patients with a visual acuity of at least 20/20 also demonstrated central fixation using both techniques.

Conclusions:

Using the streak of a Welch Allyn ophthalmoscope as a visuoscope target allows for testing of eccentric fixation in children younger than 3 years.

J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus 2005;42:89–96.

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