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Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 2016;54(12):23–27
Published Online:https://doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20161208-05Cited by:4

Abstract

Listening to music may be thought of as noninvasive and nonpharmacological, but music should be considered a drug therapy. Music exposure has measurable neurobiological effects that are linked to systems regulating reward, motivation, and pleasure; stress and arousal; and immunity. Functional neuroimaging and lesion studies demonstrate that music-evoked emotions are associated with modulation of linked limbic and paralimbic brain regions. Some of these regions are involved in reward, motivation, and pleasure, and there are additional projections to brain structures regulating autonomic, emotional, and cognitive function. Controlled clinical studies have found significant benefits with the use of music for depression and anxiety, pain relief, stroke recovery, schizophrenia, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. Because music is not associated with significant adverse effects, it is a viable adjunctive treatment option for patients in many different clinical settings. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(12), 23–27.]

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