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Published Online:https://doi.org/10.3928/19404921-20190612-01Cited by:1

Abstract

Diabetes increases the risk for cognitive impairment and doubles the rate of cognitive decline after diagnosis. In turn, cognitive dysfunction makes diabetes self-management more difficult. Nurses who help manage these conditions are focused on identifying patients at risk for complications, promoting symptom management, and preventing further decline. The purpose of the current study was to develop and pilot test a nurse-led comprehensive cognitive training intervention for individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the Memory Attention and Problem Solving Skills in Persons With Diabetes Mellitus (MAPSS-DM). The 8-week intervention combined in-person classes and online computer training. Development included: (a) adaptation of established, tested interventions; (b) interviews with stakeholders; (c) integration of course content; and (d) pilot testing of the intervention in a one-group, pre-/posttest design (N = 19). Postintervention scores improved in all areas; improvements were statistically significant for diet adherence (t[18] = −2.41, p < 0.005), memory ability (t[18] = 5.54, p < 0.01), and executive function (t[18] = 3.11, p < 0.01). Fifty-eight percent of participants stated the intervention helped their diabetes self-management, and 74% indicated they wanted to continue using cognitive strategies learned in the intervention. Results from this study showed the MAPSS-DM to be a promising cognitive training intervention for individuals with T2DM.

Targets:

Individuals with T2DM.

Intervention Description:

In-person classes and online computer training of a cognitive training intervention.

Mechanisms of Action:

Participants who completed the intervention would show improved cognitive function, which would result in improved self-management adherence followed by better glycemic control.

Outcomes:

Improved diabetes self-management and sustained use of learned cognitive strategies.

[Res Gerontol Nurs. 2019; 12(4):203–212.]

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