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Pediatric Annals, 2020;49(2):e82–e87
Published Online:https://doi.org/10.3928/19382359-20200122-01Cited by:5

Abstract

Sleep is a necessary function of life. Fetuses and neonates spend most of their day sleeping, making it paramount to place emphasis on adequate and optimal sleep. As the current body of literature continues to expand, we have increased our understanding of sleep and its role in development. Sleep disturbances, particularly early in life can affect all aspects of health such as neurological development, emotional well-being, and overall growth. This article aims to provide a primer on sleep development from fetal life into the neonatal period, discuss sleep in both the home and hospital settings, explore the tools used to measure sleep, and review common interventions applied to those infants experiencing poor sleep. Lastly, there is a mention of long-term outcomes and how early recognition and implementation of measures could help to improve overall growth and development throughout childhood. [Pediatr Ann. 2020;49(2):e82–e87.]

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